previous me (mostly)

The creation of dilettante happened because I was interested in Flock.

In 2005, WordPress.com were offering weblogs to those that did not have a weblog and wanted to play with Flock. I applied for one, did not hear anything, and in the meantime was able to play with the WordPress software on another host.

I established ‘quikbits’ in order to play with WordPress and to make available responses to frequently asked questions that I was receiving from novice computer users that were using Linux. Then real life overwhelmed me and I discontinued this blog. Unfortunately, this sub-domain still exists and visitors are re-directed to the web site of the host.

Having a Debian system often meant that I would be downloading the latest Flock as a .gz and installing to the appropriate directory. There was no installer if I wanted to use the features that were becoming available thick and fast. At the time of playing with Flock, I was not interested in blogging so much, as being able to easily copy excerpts and links. It has always been important to me that I can acknowledge the source, and I saw Flock as a way to add to my reading list. A sort of web bibliography tool.

I haven’t looked at Flock for many months, especially when I became busy with my post-graduate studies at The University of Western Australia.

Unlike many things in life so far, I can blame the starting of this online journal on my Mam.

Mam supposedly retired in the middle of last year. But this year, just weeks after arriving home after a trek to South Australia, Northern Territory and the North-West of Western Australia, Mam decided to do relief teaching. Her first posting is in Ngalapita (pronounced nula bida) at the Ngalapita Remote Community School. The closest ‘main’ town is Fitzroy Crossing. I can’t find a suitable map online, so until I do, Fitzroy Crossing will do as a map location.

The day before leaving again for the Kimberley, Mam showed me a paper napkin or serviette where she had written the word ‘blog’. She thought that the person that she was with meant ‘blah blah blah’ with regard to setting up a web site for an association that they had created.

Mam being up in Ngalapita, I decided to contribute to my online journal to let my Mam and Step-Dad know what I was doing in Perth. Hence the beginning of contributing to my online journal.

I will make “About Me” up as I go along. Once I get into the swing of things perhaps I can pull it together here. It’s awkward to provide an overview or about page when I’m interested in many many things.

Now that I am a regular contributor to my online weblog, I may get back into playing and using Flock – just because I can.

I tend to frolic in my sandbox at perspicuity, and more recently, I decided to re-establish quikbits here at WordPress.com.

8 thoughts on “previous me (mostly)

  1. It looks like you can now sell your DNA for at least $5,000 on the site SellMyDNA.com (http://www.sellmydna.com). The company purchasing it is New Line Genetics (http://www.newlinegenetics.com), and they say they’ll use it for obtaining embryonic stem cells, and then they’ll grow those stem cells into replacement organs in the lab.

    I can see a gigantic battle emerging between those who think this will be beneficial to mankind, and those who think that selling their DNA is akin to selling their soul. Of course, there’s also the stem cell debate that’s currently raging around the world.

    If you decide to post on it, would you please let me know? I’d be very interested to hear what you and your readers have to say about this issue.

    Thanks,

    Anthony

  2. @Anthony

    Thanks for leaving a comment.

    If I do post on stem cell research, it is most likely to be from an Australian perspective.

    In the meantime, you may wish to see the resources provided by the Australian Science Media Centre (AusSMC) on stem cells. Hint: Scroll the page. The topics are in alphabetical order.

  3. @Kristy

    Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment and letting me know that you included “The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.” in your article.

    I have been meaning to track down the original source of the quote since I saw it in an email signature and started to use it here.

    So far I have been able to narrow the attribution to Dorothy Parker and Ellen Parr.

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